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Police Escort in Funeral Procession Does Not Trigger "Emergency Doctrine" Defense (NY)

January 10, 2019

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In <em><a href="http://blog.wcmlaw.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/State-Farm-v.-County-of-Nassau.pdf">State Farm v. County of Nassau</a></em>, State Farm sought recovery for property damage as part of a subrogation claim, where its insured driver, Licata was driving when he came to a full stop at a “T” intersection. There was bumper to bumper traffic on both his right and left due to a funeral procession. After looking in both directions he started to make a left hand turn. During his turn, he was struck by a police car. Mr. Licata said that the police car did not have its siren or lights on. The police officer contradicted this account. He stated that he had his lights and sirens on because he was proceeding from the back of the funeral line to the front to help escort the vehicles through the intersection.

The court was presented with the question of whether the negligence or reckless disregard standard applied. The court held that no emergency existed when the police officer was escorting the funeral procession. Therefore, the ordinary negligence standard applied. The court noted that the police officers testimony was extremely credible and that they believed him when he said he had his siren and lights on prior to the impact. Unfortunately, for him it did not matter.

The takeaway from this case is a simple one. Not every time an officer has his or her lights and sirens on will it automatically be considered an emergency situation. It is going to depend on the specific facts and circumstances of the occurrence. Here, the court made it clear, a police officer escorting a funeral procession is not considered an emergency.

This case also has a thorough and interesting analysis pertaining to issues of law (applicability of emergency doctrine) and issues of fact (apportionment of fault.)   Thanks to Marc Schauer for his contribution to this post.  Please email <a href="mailto:BGibbons@wcmlaw.com">Brian Gibbons</a> with any questions.

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