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Store Owes No Duty to Control Unexpectedly Rowdy Patrons (PA)

August 23, 2017

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On August 17, 2017, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania affirmed an entry of summary judgment in favor of several defendants in <em><a href="http://blog.wcmlaw.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Reason-v.-Kathryn’s-Korner-Thrift-Shop-et-al..pdf">Reason v. Kathryn’s Korner Thrift Shop et al.</a></em>  The case involves a fight at a thrift shop in Philadelphia.  On the date of loss, Reason went shopping at Kathryn’s Korner Thrift Shop, where Defendant Riley was a cashier, and her daughter, Thomas, was also present at the store.  (Thomas has a history of mental illness, but there is no evidence that she was violent.)  As Reason was making purchases at the register, Thomas accused Reason of throwing something at her mother, and Reason and Thomas began fight.Riley pushed a panic button at the store and called the police with her phone.
We surmise Reason lost the fight, because she filed suit against Riley, Thomas, the thrift store, and the other owners of the property, alleging various claims for negligence and assault and battery.  All of the defendants, except for Thomas, were granted summary judgment.  Reason then appealed on the issues of whether the defendants owed her a duty to protect her against acts by third persons and whether they breached a duty to provide aid.
In Pennsylvania, there is generally no duty to control the acts of third parties unless a defendant stands in a special relationship with either the actor or the victim.  The relationship between a business and its invitee is one of those relationships.  Pennsylvania then follows the Second Restatement of Torts section that states that a possessor of land owes a duty to invitees for negligent or intentional acts by third parties only if they can reasonably anticipate such conduct.  The court found no evidence that defendants should have reasonably anticipated Thomas’s violent behavior.
When it comes to a duty to aid, Pennsylvania has rejected the Restatement of Torts and only imposes a duty upon businesses to call for medical professionals or police when necessary.  Businesses and their employees are under no duty to jump into the role of a medic or police officer since this would then place untrained persons in harm’s way as well.  The court again affirmed the lower court’s decision and found that because Riley pressed the store’s panic button and called the police on her phone, that she and the other defendants had fulfilled their duty to come to Reason’s aid.  As such there was no breach.  Thanks to Peter Cardwell for his contribution to this post.  Please email <a href="mailto:BGibbons@wcmlaw.com">Brian Gibbons</a> with any questions.

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